Sunday, May 01, 2005

Show me your juicy phrases....

I can't get interested in a book. Maybe a bodice-ripping romance is in the cards. Better yet, something dark and moody and grotesque. Maybe murder?

Everyone recommend a book to me, whether it's bodice-ripping or murderous or not. I love recommendations.

On TV: Desperate Housewives already went off, so what's the point?
Music: Gavin
Not reading: Bachelor Girl (too dry for current mood)
In my head: Homicide and jury duty.

18 comments:

  1. Andi-

    I really can't wait to find a book to read. I'm slowly (EVER-SO-SLOWLY) moving through "The Mysteries of Pittsburgh" by Chabon. Damn. I loved Kavalier and Clay. Um...no time means no likey Mysteries.

    -Tim

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  2. Hey try The contortionist's handbook. Really interesting tale of a man who is really good at forging new identies but not much else so he keeps starting new lives.

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  3. I've never read Chabon, but I watched Wonderboys this morning! :o) I've wanted to read it for a while, but I always seem to forget about it when I go to the book store or library.

    Will look into The Mysteries of Pittsburgh...never heard of it! And I figured you'd like Kavalier and Clay...comics and all. :o)

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  4. OOooh, anon, that sounds loverly in a weird-loverly way. Thanks for the rec!

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  5. Just a random question... What's the difference between a "bodice ripping romance" and porno (besides pics)? I've been wondering that for years...

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  6. Well, in a bodice-ripping romance they talk a little. Prolly the only difference. I'm actually not a bodice-ripping fan, although I have read a few to see what the hoopla was about. I wasn't impressed. Too formulaic. Again, like porn. lol

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  7. Oh, I posted my "juicy phrase" on my blog 'cuz it's long... It's not a great literary work by any means, but the spirituality! I could probably unpack a 10 page paper on the theology of this 2 page excerpt!

    Oh, and if you liked Stigmata (cool but grossly inaccurate movie), you can find out a little about the REAL DEAL at my place...

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  8. i used to read the bodice-rippers all the time in the back of my grade 7 math class. after a while you learn that the good sex stuff starts on page 256 (or whatever) and you skip all the crappy writing and head right to the good stuff!

    and my book recommendation is 'Sins of the Wolf' by Anne Perry....and 'Clifford the big red dog'!

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  9. Thanks Cher! I'll head over to your blog shortly!

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  10. Ago,
    Yep, it becomes pretty easy to spot the sex. lol I used to do that with Nora Roberts when I was younger. lol

    Thanks for the Perry rec. I've heard a lot about her, but I've never read any of her stuff.

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  11. Porno is much more direct. In bodice rippers they say things like "his steel-like manhood pulsed with forbidden lust...."

    I just put down a book I spent all of last week trying to get into. Now I'm reading Reading Lolita in Tehran and its great!

    I would recommend The Bell Jar (my fav.) or an Atwood. Oryx and Crake is the best Atwood book I have ever read or the Handmaid's Tale. They are both dystopian nightmares --- but sooooooo good!

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  12. Amanda, I love that we're so in tune on the books. Which one could you not get into?? I can't remember what you were reading last week. lol

    I've had an urge to re-read The Bell Jar lately because it's been so many years since I read it for the first time. I loved The Handmaid's Tale, but I haven't read Oryx and Crake. I was eyeing Cat's Eye last night, but I finally picked up Beats by Joyce Carol Oates. Love her moody darkness.

    You rock with the recs!

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  13. I was never able to get in to Atwoods Robber Bride (sorry non) but A Handmaidens Tail is the BEST BOOK EVER.

    Best I tell ya.

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  14. I was trying to get into Mark Edmundson's Why Read?. It is less than 200 pages and the book jacket said that it is for teachers and students passionate about reading. I didn't find any passion. It was really about how to be a good humanites professor and how to address critical theories, blah, blah, blah.... I was in the mood for a "book about books" and Reading Lolita in Tehran is a wonderful book-lust fulfilment.

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  15. hey I've used the word LUST twice today. Now make that three times.... maybe I'm ovulating....

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  16. Have you been on Amazon lately? The Gold Box is back and everytime I have looked at it, it had BOOKS in it! At great discounted prices! I think AMazon is out to get me!

    As for recommendations: for fluff I say Marian Keyes or Anna Maxted.

    For YA INKHEART for goodness sakes already!

    For brainiac action...of course there is Atwood...but also Joyces Carol Oates, John Irving (if you need some strangeness), or some Phillip Roth.

    Oh I could go on and on. If you need more lemme know. Good luck getting out of your funk. I hope it isn't catching!

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  17. "Juicy phrases" from Inkheart
    - which I also found out is going to be made into a movie!!

    The book she had been reading was under her pillow, pressing its cover against her ear as if to lure her back into its printed pages. "I'm sure it must be very comfortable sleeping with a hard, rectangular thing like that under your head," her father had teased the first time he found a book under her pillow. "Go on, admit it, the book whispers its story to you at night."
    "Sometimes, yes," Meggie had said "But it only works for children."


    The world was a terrible place, cruel, pitiless, dark as a bad dream. Not a good place to live in. Only in books could you find pity, comfort, happiness - and love. Books loved anyone who opened them, they gave you security and friendship and didn't ask anything in return; they never went away, never, not even when you treated them badly. Love, truth, beauty, wisdom, and consolation against death. Who said that? Someone else who loved books; she couldn't remember the author's name, only the words. Words are immortal - until someone
    comes along and burns them.


    Its pages rustled promisingly when she opened it. Meggie thought this first whisper sounded a little different from book to another, depending on whether or not she already knew the story it was going to tell her.

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  18. Oh you naughty naught girls. I'm having all sorts of lustful feelings about my books now.

    Steph, Handmaid is fabulous! I couldn't get into it the first time I tried to read it, but the 2nd time I devoured it. I really have to be in the right mood for Atwood.

    Amanda,
    Bummer about Why Read. That sounds like a snoozefest. Blah. I had high hopes for you and then for me if you liked it. :oD

    Heather,
    You are the enabler of all enablers!!! I hadn't noticed that the gold box is back, and it NEVER had books in it before!!! OHmygosh!!!!

    Thanks for the recs....still gonna read Inkheart, and it looks like I'll be interlibrary loaning it. I've never read Roth, but I got into a conversation about him with a PhD candidate from the uni where I'll be gettin' my MA from the other day at the library. How was that last sentence for a mouthful?!

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